Important Elements of Differentiation

According to Tomlinson (2001), “differentiating instruction means “shaking up” what goes on in the classroom so that students have multiple options for taking in information, making sense of ideas, and expressing what they learn. In other words, a differentiated classroom provides different avenues to acquiring content, to processing or making sense of ideas, and to developing products so that each student can learn effectively.” I created my infographic with this definition in mind. After reading the assigned chapters, I felt that the main elements were special interests, levels of readiness, learning styles, content knowledge, and patience and flexibility.

I purposely chose to include patience and flexibility because it is where I struggle the most with differentiating instruction. I have a hard time being patient and I sometimes think like I’m not doing enough. It is frustrating and discouraging when plans do not go smoothly or work. I think focusing on the goal will help me.

References

Hurst, S. (2013, August 08). Six Necessary Components of Effective Differentiated Instruction. Retrieved January 19, 2016, from Reading Horizons: http://www.readinghorizons.com/blog/six-necessary-components-of-effective-differentiated-instruction

McCarthy, J. (2014, January). Learning Profile Cards. Retrieved January 19, 2016, from Opening Paths: http://openingpaths.org/blog/2014/01/learning-profile-cards/

Smith, G. E., & Throne, S. (2009). Differentiating Instruction with Technology in Middle School Classrooms. Eugene: ISTE.

Tomlinson, C. A. (2001). How to Differentiate Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms. Alexandria: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development (ASCD).

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